Archive for the ‘Attention’ Category

Santa’s Secret Tombola

December 19, 2006

santa front

Attention Credits ID S7T267692552006X was bought at Santa’s Secret Tombola

Mulled wine, decorations, Christmas trees, lights, nibbles and art all under one roof. What more could could an art-lover want on the penultimate shopping weekend before Christmas?

Check it out on Art Cornwall to see all the works that was exhibited.

Read more on BBC Where I Live

Attention Credits… coming soon

December 18, 2006

Awaiting the sucess of the £10 Secret Santa Tombola in Cornwall, more details about Attention Credits coming soon…

credits

Value Your Attention
Your attention is important and should be valued, the purpose of having the card allows you the freedom to use your attention with intent, be pro-active not passive.
Be present.
Your Attention Card contains a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) transponder. You may be aware of this technology, it is used to track parcels, inside Oyster cards and becoming closer to being inside our mobile phones.
What Attention Credits aims to do is give YOU the power to control YOUR presence and to be aware of YOUR presence.
The original project Attention Please! An experiment aimed to test an audience and was held in a contained environment, Attention Credits aims to widen our awareness. To find out more investigate this blog.

Attention tips:
Use your credits wisely.
Be a repeat giver.
To be awarded more credits pay more attention.

Research proves that you will be rewarded when you give more Attention.

If you would like to identify yourself as a participant then please leave a comment here!

ID S7T267692552006X

Who’s been talking been talking about us

June 26, 2006

money not art

So over the course of the project various people have been talking about us, now I thought it was about time I told you all about it!

We were on the front page of We Make Money Not Art for a while (that was very exciting).

rhizome newsletter

We were in rhizome e-newsletter and posted on Rhizome.org where a full discussion insued about the merits of RFID art projects.

We were on Upcoming

“The best British Art blog” The Times Oct 1st 2005 Art in Liverpool blog wrote a post on the project and a review.

Katie wrote about the project on here blog.

Networked-Performance, a research blog about network-enabled performance, [NetBehaviour] and Mobile Audiences talked about us.

And the Attention Trust

Attention Informer

May 23, 2006

timeline

Using the model of the Attention Seeker a tool bar appears once swiped to inform a viewer the current point in the duration of the film.

Like the Attention Seeker we made for the experiment, it could discreatly fade in and out at the bottom of the screen, show the duration of the video and indicate through the timeline bar what stage the video is at when you swipe. Because the unique identification number on the card for this application is not required, it would be possible to use cheaper, lower frequency tags and readers, or even use this function inconjunction with others.

This idea also goes hand in hand with, Attention (Re)Starter, where the swipe actually takes you to the beginning of the film. The problem with this idea is the same as the egg timers you get in sauna's, if it has been started before you, you need to wait either until others have left or until its ready to start again anyway. But maybe if the reader could see everyone enter and exit the screening space, it would know if you were alone and know if it were able to restart the video.

How long do you give a video…

May 23, 2006

before you more on?

 stopwatch

Also as part of the discussion at Loop was the challenge and commitment that video requires of its audience, to watch each work through its full duration would take days, by which time you either can't remember anything you've seen, or your eyes are so tired and craving daylight you couldn't care less. So its important to be selective for your sanity's sake – but with a durational medium some things just do take time. Marc Spiegler who was mentoring the discussion told us he has been speaking to Christian Jankowski about this and together they had decided that you should give a video 3mins before you move on.

Then there's the idea of a screening programme, where video's could be screened in a predetermined order at a predetermined time in more 'appropriate' setting (by appropriate I mean dark space, comfortable seating, quality projection and sound) – more like cinema or theatre, when you enter the experience with some sort of commitment to staying and watch items from the beginning to the end.

But one thing your audience needs is information, when you walk into a installation space one thing you need to know is the duration of the film, to give you a context of whether those 3mins you are going to watch are at the beginning, middle or end of the movie.

This is where my RFID project could be a solution…

What did we learn?

May 15, 2006

exhibpic

I've been taking my time to process what happened at the experiment, we had lots of feedback verbally from people at the time, their comments on this blog, and the stats we collected from the Attention Grabber. But here's some responses.

Power
People have been talking about control and the feeling of power that the card gave them. The notion of power is not something I had realised people would attach to the cards and the action of swiping. It was a conscious decision to make people feel an attachment to this card that they were being told was THEIR attention, and I felt it was important that people were part of a process. This was my method of getting the audience to participate in something that could have been quite an alien action.
Control
A number of people spoke about the idea of control. Questioning if the video is controlling you or are you controlling it? And the answer is both, the video was only changing when it received attention but it had certain conditions to fulfill before it would react.
The idea of control was a cyclical motion between viewer and viewed. It was this notion of presence, that I was trying to recreate/represent.
Interaction!????!
So I asked, "Did you feel like you were interacting?". My intention was to find out what people's response was to the idea of interaction, and in many ways I wanted the answer to be "no". But by posing the question, maybe it's my fault for misleading people into thinking about the experiment in the same terms as another interaction work.But people's perceptions of what interaction is, where the viewer does something and you get an immediate obvious reaction response, seemed to tarnish quite a number of people's experiences, because when they gave their attention they expected to get a return, and it seems the response of the acknowledgment of their attention (their photograph, name, time-stamp) was not enough.
Experiment/Research/Installation
Also I think people forgot that this was a research project rather than a completed artwork. It needed to be a professional setting for people to engage with the process properly – but this lead to some people having expectations of the content they were watching and giving responses to this rather than the issues of their live presence in the installation and its effect on the art.

Grabbing Attention at CocoaDevHouse Amsterdam

April 22, 2006

132889812_bd785382c4.jpg

CocoaDevHouse is an unconference, hackathon, geek meetup and make stuff event over 24 hours. We're half way through learning about Cocoa development, and starting to make some stuff that uses the varied and exceptional talents of the guys in the room. Paul is working on the application that turns the RFID events into usable data, records it and does nice stuff with it. The guys at CocoaDevHouse are pretty interested in making a simple Cocoa App, mixed in with a little WebObjects so it seemed like a great opportunity for them all (or 5 of them at least) to work together on it. We're making 2 apps; "Attention Seeker" and "Attention Grabber". The specifications are…..

Attention Seeker
Foreground application
Transparent window in kiosk mode that is above a video.
See http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn2002/tn2062.html
Gets RFID tag from an attached scannerProcesses this tag and brings up a message and maybe a picture (details collected by Attention Grabber). Trying to avoid using an SQL database to store pictures.
Sort of dash board effect with the application going from Transparent to translucent and then back again.
Log this somewhere.

Attention Grabber

Gets the detail for an RFID tag
User scans the tag, enters details and gets their picture taken
Log the details somewhere, which are called up by the Attention Seeker application.

Backend
The backend is going to be a simple WebObjects app which will take care of persisting the data.
Tags: rfid, , , ,
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Personal attention

April 22, 2006

You

Your attention is personal right? To you. It's yours, not someone else's.  So if we can make this not just about measuring and recording attention, but about YOUR attention, then we think we might be onto something.  We don't want to confuse the audience participation; and specifically 'interaction' with attention, as they are different things, but…. using these tags, we have unique identifiers – we know your attention is; well, yours.  So the revelation today is that instead of giving you an attention tag, we can link your attention to your picture.  You give the art your attention, it gives you some back?  Something like, that – and to be discussed further, but we're currently working to link you + your attention + your photo.

Image from 'evilibby' on Flickr.
Tags: rfid, , , .

Attention Please & Attention Trust

April 19, 2006

Whilst we are studying attention in the gallery, specifically with video art; we are also keenly following the work of the Attention Trust who are working with measuring, and rewarding attention online and in other spaces.
So we signed up as a member.


Verified AttentionTrust Member

Open Call

April 18, 2006

AP logo

We're seeking gallery goers in Liverpool to take part in an interactive experiment. The experiment asks nothing more than for you, the audience to give your attention. “Attention Please!” is a video installation with a difference; your attention is important and valuable, pay your attention carefully, and it will be rewarded.

Artist Sara Smith is working with technology partner Kisky Netmedia on this experiment using RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) technology. We're mixing techno tags with vivacious video. We're exploring presence and your effect on the art.

As people, ideas and hot new products compete for our attention through TVs, billboards, and the Internet, do they know if we're really paying attention? What if your attention can be measured? What happens when we pay attention to art? And if we do, will it change or react? Will it know? Does it matter? It does now.

We're looking for individuals and groups to participate in our experiment. Come alone, bring your friends or family; it's fun!

Pay attention at

The Box, FACT, 88 Wood Street, Liverpool, L1 4DQ.

03 & 04 May 2pm – 6pm

Just turn up.
If you want to bring a group before 2pm or only finish work at 6pm and want to come afterwards, contact us and we would be happy to accommodate you!

Looking forward to seeing you!

Attention on Upcoming please!

April 8, 2006

Attention Please! on Upcoming

We like using Upcoming.org Attention Please! An Experiment has been added to Upcoming as an event. If you're thinking of attending or just want to 'watch' the event, please add yourself on Upcoming.org. If you don't already use Upcoming, you should! It's a great way to find out about and promote events of any type in your area or interest group.

Find Attention Please! on Upcoming here.

Networking at Diffraction

April 7, 2006

diffraction

Earlier this week we were at the Diffraction conference at FACT, my technology partners KISKY were invited to present at the conference on "emerging issues and the way ahead". They had been documenting the conference and uploading everything to flickr and in their breakout group session they made a podcast, which was well attended by past and present ITEM artists.
The conference was a really good opportunity for me to not only hear about past projects and experiences, the wider discussion of arts, technology, industry and science but to start talking about my project, to meet some of the other present ITEM artist and people working with RFID. Everyone's projects are at different stages, and there were a lot of shocked faces when I told them our experiment was happening in a month. The pressure's on!!

Lots of people said they would be following the blog – I can't wait to hear what you have to say.